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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Tomato said:
Okay, so maybe I'm tired and my brain hasn't woken up 100% yet, but these words surprised me...

Nancy said:
...DO NOT put hedgie in a bath. This is the worst thing you can do...
...when they're cold/hibernating! At first I got the impression I shouldn't give them ANY baths whatsoever over the entire season! Yikes, poor hedgie! :lol:

That is great information though, but I'm curious why it has to be a digital thermometer rather than just any reliable one (digital or analog)?
You would be surprised at how many people, their first thought when they discover hedgie is hibernating is to stick them in water. I honestly do not understand the logic in sticking an unresponsive quilled up hedgehog in water. That is why the strong wording.

Digital thermometers give you a finer degree of temperature which is especially important when dealing with Celsius. Those points of a degree in Celsius is the difference of a degree when talking Fahrenheit
 

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In terms of warming, water imersion is an effective way of warming a body quickly so I can see how people can carry this idea over to hedgehogs (albeit not recommended!).

I have a few digital thermometers and they all show whole degrees only (no decimal points). I've ordered one with decimals but am waiting for it to arrive. My only concern with digital thermometers is how well its calibrated. I've compared several before in a relatively controlled environment and they differ by up to 2 degrees. That's part of the reason why I went with an industrial thermostat with hopes that it's calibrated better/more stable. Nonetheless, good to know... thanks Nancy. :)
 

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Nancy,

I just bought a CHE for Little Foot's cage and the thermometer stays pretty consistent between 78-79. Do you think that is too warm and I need to turn down the thermostat? He seems to be fine and it honestly does not feel that warm to me in his condo, but I can't really crawl in there myself. LOL

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
78/79F is a bit warm. Try turning it down so it's about 75/76F.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I'm posting a reminder about hibernation. This is the season for hibernation attempts to start.

Night time temperatures are dropping and even though the days are usually still warm enough, nights are not. Night is the most important time for hedgie to have a warm cage as this is when they are up and active and most likely to get a chill.

Our days are shorter which means an alternate light source is especially important now to compensate for the shorter daylight hours.

Our house was at 63F this morning which was about a 14 degree drop from yesterday. Thankfully I'd turned the hedgie room heat on before I went to bed and they were toasty and warm.

Here is the first post in this thread.

This is a reminder to everyone that if you haven't already done so, to get a heating and lighting system in place for your hedgehog.

Do you have an accurate digital thermostat? This is high priority and nobody can accurately guess the temperature of the hedgehogs cage without one. A thermometer should be one of the first things purchased before you get a hedgehog.

Is the area hedgie is in draft free, away from windows, off floor level and preferably on an inside wall. Regardless of how new your windows are, in front of a window is cooler than away from a window. Floor level is the coldest part of a room. Sitting the cage on a table is a warmer location. Exterior walls are always cooler than an interior wall. Draft zones are near the bottom of stairways, near windows, floor level, near furnace ducts, and near outside doors.

Temperature is important. Although it is generally recommended they need temperatures at or above 73F/23C, this is often not warm enough. Most hedgehogs seem to like 75F/24C but there are some that even this is not warm enough. Each hedgehog is individual and just because it's parents or siblings are comfortable at 73, doesn't mean yours will be. If a breeder tells you their hedgehogs are fine without extra warmth, don't pay attention. Most hedgehogs are not fine at the temperatures most of us keep our houses at.

Using supplemental lighting is a must at this time of year. With shorter days, less intense sunlight, and more dull dark days, light coming in a window is not enough. All that is required is to leave a light on near the cage from 7ish am until 9ish pm. Some people recommend a broad spectrum light and this is fine to use but a regular light will work as well. Some hedgehogs are really light sensitive and will attempt hibernation if they are not getting enough light. Even though they are in their dark hedgie bag or igloo, they still must have adequate light. It's best to either put the light on a timer, or make sure you remember to turn the light on.

Signs of hibernation or being too cool
If your hedgehog is in a full hibernation attempt it will be in a curled up quilly ball and be unresponsive. Cold radiates from their body. This is serious and the hedgehog needs to be warmed up immediately but slowly.

Put hedgie under your clothing so he can warm up slowly. If you have a human heating pad, you can set it on low, lay it on your lap and set hedgie on it. Make sure hedgie is not warming up too quickly. NEVER leave an unresponsive hedgehog on a heating pad or any heating device.

Depending on how long hedgie has been trying to hibernate, he may come out of it within a few minutes or it could be half an hour or more. If hedgie is not responding within 45 to 60 minutes of warming, he needs to see a vet immediately. This is an emergency life and death situation.

When hedgie first comes out of it, he will be wobbly on his feet and be a bit disoriented. This should go away fairly soon.

After hedgie has attempted hibernation, his cage needs to be kept a couple of degrees warmer. The chance of him attempting it again within the next week or two is high so make sure he doesn't not risk getting cold again.

Sometimes hedgie is not quite warm enough but is not at the point of a full hibernation attempt. Decreased appetite and less activity are two signs hedgie is not warm enough. His body may feel slightly cool but he will still be responsive. Sometimes they may be wobbly on their feet and lethargic. Hedgie needs a warmer cage.

DO NOT put hedgie in a bath. This is the worst thing you can do but unfortunately often it's the first thing people think to do. The sudden warm of the water shocks their system. There is risk that hedgie will aspirate some water. Once done hedgie is wet and at even more risk of getting chilled.

Hibernation attempts lower their immune system which leave them open to respiratory infections, mite outbreaks and other diseases. Some wonder if repeated hibernation attempts make the hedgehog more at risk of cancers and other diseases. Hibernation attempts should not be taken lightly.

Don't ever assume your hedgehog will not need a heat source. Most do. If you are not comfortable leaving a heating device on 24/7 or while no one is at home, a hedgehog is not the pet for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
This is a reminder about the importance of having a heating source and lighting for your hedgehog. Although the days are still warm, nights are starting to get cool and our days are getting shorter. I've had night time heating for my gang most nights for the past couple of weeks.

If you don't already have a heat source, it's best to it set up now before it's needed. A hibernation attempt lowers the hedgehogs immune system so it's best to have heating in place before the hedgehog attempts hibernation.

If you do find your hedgehog attempting hibernation, DO NOT put him/her in water. Hedgie needs to warm up slowly.

Do you have an accurate digital thermostat? This is high priority and nobody can accurately guess the temperature of the hedgehogs cage without one. A thermometer should be one of the first things purchased before you get a hedgehog.

Is the area hedgie is in draft free, away from windows, off floor level and preferably on an inside wall. Regardless of how new your windows are, in front of a window is cooler than away from a window. Floor level is the coldest part of a room. Sitting the cage on a table is a warmer location. Exterior walls are always cooler than an interior wall. Draft zones are near the bottom of stairways, near windows, floor level, near furnace ducts, and near outside doors.

Temperature is important. Although it is generally recommended they need temperatures at or above 73F/23C, this is often not warm enough. Most hedgehogs seem to like 75F/24C but there are some that even this is not warm enough. Each hedgehog is individual and just because it's parents or siblings are comfortable at 73, doesn't mean yours will be. If a breeder tells you their hedgehogs are fine without extra warmth, don't pay attention. Most hedgehogs are not fine at the temperatures most of us keep our houses at.

Using supplemental lighting is a must at this time of year. With shorter days, less intense sunlight, and more dull dark days, light coming in a window is not enough. All that is required is to leave a light on near the cage from 7ish am until 9ish pm. Some people recommend a broad spectrum light and this is fine to use but a regular light will work as well. Some hedgehogs are really light sensitive and will attempt hibernation if they are not getting enough light. Even though they are in their dark hedgie bag or igloo, they still must have adequate light. It's best to either put the light on a timer, or make sure you remember to turn the light on.

Signs of hibernation or being too cool
If your hedgehog is in a full hibernation attempt it will be in a curled up quilly ball and be unresponsive. Cold radiates from their body. This is serious and the hedgehog needs to be warmed up immediately but slowly.

Put hedgie under your clothing so he can warm up slowly. If you have a human heating pad, you can set it on low, lay it on your lap and set hedgie on it. Make sure hedgie is not warming up too quickly. NEVER leave an unresponsive hedgehog on a heating pad or any heating device.

Depending on how long hedgie has been trying to hibernate, he may come out of it within a few minutes or it could be half an hour or more. If hedgie is not responding within 45 to 60 minutes of warming, he needs to see a vet immediately. This is an emergency life and death situation.

When hedgie first comes out of it, he will be wobbly on his feet and be a bit disoriented. This should go away fairly soon.

After hedgie has attempted hibernation, his cage needs to be kept a couple of degrees warmer. The chance of him attempting it again within the next week or two is high so make sure he doesn't not risk getting cold again.

Sometimes hedgie is not quite warm enough but is not at the point of a full hibernation attempt. Decreased appetite and less activity are two signs hedgie is not warm enough. His body may feel slightly cool but he will still be responsive. Sometimes they may be wobbly on their feet and lethargic. Hedgie needs a warmer cage.

DO NOT put hedgie in a bath. This is the worst thing you can do but unfortunately often it's the first thing people think to do. The sudden warm of the water shocks their system. There is risk that hedgie will aspirate some water. Once done hedgie is wet and at even more risk of getting chilled.

Hibernation attempts lower their immune system which leave them open to respiratory infections, mite outbreaks and other diseases. Some wonder if repeated hibernation attempts make the hedgehog more at risk of cancers and other diseases. Hibernation attempts should not be taken lightly.

Don't ever assume your hedgehog will not need a heat source. Most do. If you are not comfortable leaving a heating device on 24/7 or while no one is at home, a hedgehog is not the pet for you.
 

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It's getting cold for most people now, great time for a hibernation reminder. Keep those hedgies warm, everyone! :)

... for hibernation attempts.

This is a reminder to everyone that if you haven't already done so, to get a heating and lighting system in place for your hedgehog.

Do you have an accurate digital thermostat? This is high priority and nobody can accurately guess the temperature of the hedgehogs cage without one. A thermometer should be one of the first things purchased before you get a hedgehog.

Is the area hedgie is in draft free, away from windows, off floor level and preferably on an inside wall. Regardless of how new your windows are, in front of a window is cooler than away from a window. Floor level is the coldest part of a room. Sitting the cage on a table is a warmer location. Exterior walls are always cooler than an interior wall. Draft zones are near the bottom of stairways, near windows, floor level, near furnace ducts, and near outside doors.

Temperature is important. Although it is generally recommended they need temperatures at or above 73F/23C, this is often not warm enough. Most hedgehogs seem to like 75F/24C but there are some that even this is not warm enough. Each hedgehog is individual and just because it's parents or siblings are comfortable at 73, doesn't mean yours will be. If a breeder tells you their hedgehogs are fine without extra warmth, don't pay attention. Most hedgehogs are not fine at the temperatures most of us keep our houses at.

Using supplemental lighting is a must at this time of year. With shorter days, less intense sunlight, and more dull dark days, light coming in a window is not enough. All that is required is to leave a light on near the cage from 7ish am until 9ish pm. Some people recommend a broad spectrum light and this is fine to use but a regular light will work as well. Some hedgehogs are really light sensitive and will attempt hibernation if they are not getting enough light. Even though they are in their dark hedgie bag or igloo, they still must have adequate light. It's best to either put the light on a timer, or make sure you remember to turn the light on.

Signs of hibernation or being too cool
If your hedgehog is in a full hibernation attempt it will be in a curled up quilly ball and be unresponsive. Cold radiates from their body. This is serious and the hedgehog needs to be warmed up immediately but slowly.

Put hedgie under your clothing so he can warm up slowly. If you have a human heating pad, you can set it on low, lay it on your lap and set hedgie on it. Make sure hedgie is not warming up too quickly. NEVER leave an unresponsive hedgehog on a heating pad or any heating device.

Depending on how long hedgie has been trying to hibernate, he may come out of it within a few minutes or it could be half an hour or more. If hedgie is not responding within 45 to 60 minutes of warming, he needs to see a vet immediately. This is an emergency life and death situation.

When hedgie first comes out of it, he will be wobbly on his feet and be a bit disoriented. This should go away fairly soon.

After hedgie has attempted hibernation, his cage needs to be kept a couple of degrees warmer. The chance of him attempting it again within the next week or two is high so make sure he doesn't not risk getting cold again.

Sometimes hedgie is not quite warm enough but is not at the point of a full hibernation attempt. Decreased appetite and less activity are two signs hedgie is not warm enough. His body may feel slightly cool but he will still be responsive. Sometimes they may be wobbly on their feet and lethargic. Hedgie needs a warmer cage.

DO NOT put hedgie in a bath. This is the worst thing you can do but unfortunately often it's the first thing people think to do. The sudden warm of the water shocks their system. There is risk that hedgie will aspirate some water. Once done hedgie is wet and at even more risk of getting chilled.

Hibernation attempts lower their immune system which leave them open to respiratory infections, mite outbreaks and other diseases. Some wonder if repeated hibernation attempts make the hedgehog more at risk of cancers and other diseases. Hibernation attempts should not be taken lightly.

Don't ever assume your hedgehog will not need a heat source. Most do. If you are not comfortable leaving a heating device on 24/7 or while no one is at home, a hedgehog is not the pet for you.
 

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a few weeks ago during the hurricane i lost power for a week. i was able to plug an extension cord to my neighbors generator and keep Morrison's light on. the next morning i checked on him and he was unresponsive, so i took him out and put him in my sweatshirt and sat in my car (i had the heat on, not too high). after about 20 minutes he began to huff a little and then move around, an hour later he was able to walk again. it was scary, but he is doing well now
 

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Just wanted to add my thanks! I appreciate this post. I had read it before I even got Prim so I would know what to watch for so thanks again!
 

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Super useful post! Even though I think I am usually attempting to hibernate more often than Marquis de Sade during winter, so our heating is constantly on, I am glad I have read about the water tips! The first thing I do when I get cold is to get a hot shower, so I can imagine why there is this misconception :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
... for hibernation attempts.

I'm bumping this up as it's that time of year.

This is a reminder to everyone that if you haven't already done so, to get a heating and lighting system in place for your hedgehog.

Do you have an accurate digital thermostat? This is high priority and nobody can accurately guess the temperature of the hedgehogs cage without one. A thermometer should be one of the first things purchased before you get a hedgehog.

Is the area hedgie is in draft free, away from windows, off floor level and preferably on an inside wall. Regardless of how new your windows are, in front of a window is cooler than away from a window. Floor level is the coldest part of a room. Sitting the cage on a table is a warmer location. Exterior walls are always cooler than an interior wall. Draft zones are near the bottom of stairways, near windows, floor level, near furnace ducts, and near outside doors.

Temperature is important. Although it is generally recommended they need temperatures at or above 73F/23C, this is often not warm enough. Most hedgehogs seem to like 75F/24C but there are some that even this is not warm enough. Each hedgehog is individual and just because it's parents or siblings are comfortable at 73, doesn't mean yours will be. If a breeder tells you their hedgehogs are fine without extra warmth, don't pay attention. Most hedgehogs are not fine at the temperatures most of us keep our houses at.

Using supplemental lighting is a must at this time of year. With shorter days, less intense sunlight, and more dull dark days, light coming in a window is not enough. All that is required is to leave a light on near the cage from 7ish am until 9ish pm. Some people recommend a broad spectrum light and this is fine to use but a regular light will work as well. Some hedgehogs are really light sensitive and will attempt hibernation if they are not getting enough light. Even though they are in their dark hedgie bag or igloo, they still must have adequate light. It's best to either put the light on a timer, or make sure you remember to turn the light on.

Signs of hibernation or being too cool
If your hedgehog is in a full hibernation attempt it will be in a curled up quilly ball and be unresponsive. Cold radiates from their body. This is serious and the hedgehog needs to be warmed up immediately but slowly.

Put hedgie under your clothing so he can warm up slowly. If you have a human heating pad, you can set it on low, lay it on your lap and set hedgie on it. Make sure hedgie is not warming up too quickly. NEVER leave an unresponsive hedgehog on a heating pad or any heating device.

Depending on how long hedgie has been trying to hibernate, he may come out of it within a few minutes or it could be half an hour or more. If hedgie is not responding within 45 to 60 minutes of warming, he needs to see a vet immediately. This is an emergency life and death situation.

When hedgie first comes out of it, he will be wobbly on his feet and be a bit disoriented. This should go away fairly soon.

After hedgie has attempted hibernation, his cage needs to be kept a couple of degrees warmer. The chance of him attempting it again within the next week or two is high so make sure he doesn't not risk getting cold again.

Sometimes hedgie is not quite warm enough but is not at the point of a full hibernation attempt. Decreased appetite and less activity are two signs hedgie is not warm enough. His body may feel slightly cool but he will still be responsive. Sometimes they may be wobbly on their feet and lethargic. Hedgie needs a warmer cage.

DO NOT put hedgie in a bath. This is the worst thing you can do but unfortunately often it's the first thing people think to do. The sudden warm of the water shocks their system. There is risk that hedgie will aspirate some water. Once done hedgie is wet and at even more risk of getting chilled.

Hibernation attempts lower their immune system which leave them open to respiratory infections, mite outbreaks and other diseases. Some wonder if repeated hibernation attempts make the hedgehog more at risk of cancers and other diseases. Hibernation attempts should not be taken lightly.

Don't ever assume your hedgehog will not need a heat source. Most do. If you are not comfortable leaving a heating device on 24/7 or while no one is at home, a hedgehog is not the pet for you.
 

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Always good to have a reminder! I am in the process of moving all the hedgies upstairs to our loft as it is always a few degrees warmer than the rest of the apartment and adjusting the space heater we picked up super clearance last year ($5!).

All this and I live in sunny Tampa, Florida! But we did have some cold spells last year that made me nervous! So EVERYONE, better safe than dead!
 

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Thank you from a newbie!! I had a hard time trying to set up my CHE & thermostat last night, but I'm glad I am struggling with it now instead of when the temps drop! I want it to be all set to go when my hedgie needs it. I already have her lamp on a timer as well since the dark has been sneaking up on me lately, lol
 

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Awesome post, and important to remember that now is the time to make sure all your heating sources are set up properly... not when the cold has already hit and you are scrambling!
 
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Help! 1st Hibernation attempt and I put him in the bath.

Ack! I put my hedgie in the bath before I read this! I didn't know of anything else to warm him up, now he's under my shirt with blankets over him but I'm worried, is there anything else I can do?
 

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I just got my first hedgehog and wanted to ask about hibernation. His cage stays very warm with the thermostat and heat emitter as it should, but I was wondering what I am supposed to do when I have him out of the cage. The house is usuaully in the high 60's. Is having him out each day for a little while enough for him to attempt hibernation or are short exposures of cooler air ok? How quickly can hibernation attempts take place?
 

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It's best to start a new thread for your question - not as many people read old threads so your question is less likely to be answered.

That said, short periods of time in the high 60s should be ok, and if you spend that time cuddling with him your body heat will keep him plenty warm. :)
 
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