Hedgehog Central banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,963 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I keep Lily up in my room, on the second floor of our house. We do have air conditioning, but it doesn't get to the second floor very well, so the temperatures get up pretty high sometimes, if it's a hot day. I think it can even get up near 90 sometimes. So I was wondering a few things.
1) Should I consider moving Lily's cage downstairs someplace during the summer, making sure that the air conditioning doesn't get too cool for her?
2) What's the highest comfortable temperature for hedgies?
3) Is there anything I can add to her cage to help her be able to cool off better in hot weather?
4) Should I still use fleece for her liners/strips in her pigloo? Or should I switch to a different, cooler fabric? If so, what do you suggest?
Thanks for any help! I just thought I should ask about this before I end up with an 80 degree day, lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
I'd very much like to know about this too!

Where I live (Memphis) gets really, really hot in the summer... We just got new AC units, so I'm not too worried about the house being too hot, but it's all good stuff to know - especially if we need or want to take her anywhere.

Also, I think I remember seeing one girl (drpepperheather I think?) put a ceramic tile in the corner of her hedgie's cage in case he ever wanted a cool place to splat out... I'd never heard of it before, but it sounds reasonable to me... :) Anyone care to comment?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
395 Posts
The African species, on the other hand, had to adapt to an entirely dissimilar habitat. Instead of the freezing winters of Europe, the African hedgehog had the blazing summers of the African grasslands to contend with. Once again, food source and body heat were the two motivating factors, but the resulting response was remarkably different.

During the hot summer months (which, coincidentally coincide with our winters) just following the rainy season, the African plains become very hot and dry. The hedgehog's food source dwindles and its ability maintain body temperature is compromised. The heat of the day is just too great for an animal such as this.

In response, the hedgehog seeks out a cool hiding place and, like the European hedgehog, enters a semi-stuporous state. This normally occurs between the months of January to March. Unlike the European hedgehog, however, this is not hibernation. Rather, it is more fittingly described using the term "Aestivation" - a period of heat-induced stupor that is less intense than hibernation. The animal's metabolic rate slows, but not nearly to the same low levels that occur during hibernation. The African hedgehogs still venture out from their hiding places on a fairly regular basis, but their activity levels are greatly reduced and they may even sleep for periods of up to one week at a time.
Room temperatures between 72 to 80*F are needed to prevent an African pygmy hedgehog from entering hibernation. When the hedgehog enters hibernation it greatly reduces it's immune systems capabilities and may become more susceptible to illness. Do not allow your hedgehog to hibernate as it will seriously harm the hedgehog. It is recommended to keep the ambient temperature of the cage between 74 to 78*F as a hedgehog can attempt hibernation below temperature of 72*F or aestivation at temperatures higher than 80*F.
Not as severe as Hibernation, but still not something you want to happen. If you need to quickly cool a cage, put a frozen water bottle on top of it, and let the cool air flow down into the cage.
The ceramic tile also doesn't seem like a bad idea for a hedgie to splat out on, but it still should not be relied on.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,963 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Alright, I didn't know about that. I'll have to keep an eye on the temp in my room then. She might need to be moved downstairs if there's periods where it gets too hot up there. Does anyone have any suggestions on changing the fabric of her liner and bedding strips in her igloo? I don't want it to be something that'll fray, but I thought maybe something that's cooler will be more comfortable for her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
395 Posts
for a liner, you may want to try denim or flannel. As for bedding strips, a lot of other fabrics tatter easily which could cause harm to your hedgie. It's best to just stick with the fleece strips
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,963 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Alright, thank you. :) I'll buy some denim for summer liners then!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Personally for liners I think you really could use any fabric on one condition: Lily isn't the type to go underneath the liners. If she isn't, then you could hem just about anything so that the seams are not on top. If you can do this then a great fabric (though slightly expensive) is CoolMax, it is used in a lot of sports clothing and helps to wick away heat, water, ect.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top