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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I was just taking a look around the site and started noticing that a lot of people are using fleece liners. I currently use Carefresh, but I find that somehow the stuff ends up all over my apartment. I was just wondering how the fleece liners work and if anyone had some tips.

Thanks,
Chelsea (and Camus)
 

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HI there!

I'm allergic to the dust created by things like wood shavings, so my decision to switch to fleece liners was a benefit to me and my little boy hedgie (he didn't like the shavings b/c they kept getting stuck in his boy parts). Never used Carefresh, but I'd imagine it flies out of the cage and gets all over the carpet the same as wood shavings do. ^_^

Basically, a fleece liner works the same way shavings and bedding do, it absorbs liquids and gives your hedgie a place to walk on.

You can either make one yourself, or ask one of our many talented hedgie lovers here on the boards for recommendations on where to buy one pre-made. I was lucky enough to be gifted with sewing skills from my mother, so I make my own using the following formula:

1 layer fleece
2 layers cloth diaper flannel (this is in the middle in order to absorb pee and spills)
1 layer fleece

I sew it all together like a big cloth sandwich and make them to fit the size of my hedgie's cage. Then I use the leftover fabric to make blankies, pillows, etc.

Personally I think fleece, cotton, or flannel liners are a good choice because they 1) don't dry out your hedgie's skin, or cause adverse skin reactions like some kinds of bedding can, and 2) They don't get stuck in or cause problems with hedgie genitalia. Another perk is you're saving money in the long run and doing a favor for the environment.

When your liner is dirty, just take it out of the cage, make sure any poo winds up in the trash, and toss that sucker in the washing machine ( I use All free & clear detergent b/c it has no dyes, scents, etc) and depending on washing and drying time, now your liner's all clean and ready to go back in the cage again!

A caution regarding all fabrics: beware loose threads or exposed stitching. Hedgies can get their limbs caught in loose threads or loops in fabrics such as terry-cloth (towels) and this can cause lots of problems with circulation, I've heard in come cases it can result in loss of a limb. So just be extra careful to check out the seams and look for lose threads before letting your little one loose on their new liner. ^_^

~Katie
 

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I have been using fleece liners now for a few weeks and I love it. No litter all over and Autumn has even picked a single spot as a potty. Thats amazing after failing litter training. Now I can put a second smaller 'litter pad' in that spot and swap it out daily which helps keep the full liner clean longer.
 

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I have used fleece liners since i got my lil guy and i wouldnt go to shavings ever. Liners are so easy. I use a baby blanket folded in half, its absorbent, safe and washable. Plus it cost £2 so very cheap. i have 4 of them and change them twice a week depending on how messy he decides to be!
 

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Just a WARNING on fleece..

I used fleece for a couple of previous hedgies and never had a problem. My new hedgie got some stuck at the base of his quills though and the process of removing it was painstaking for both of us! I know all hedgies are different but I had never thought of there being an issue from fleece. I now use CarpetFresh.

He is around 7 months old too, so maybe age had something to do with this?
 

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Fleece can come apart as little bits of fluff if you've got a burrower who likes to try to dig on their liners, inside their hedgie bags, etc.

And I hope to goodness you mean CareFresh, not CarpetFresh...*grin*
 

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Yes, some hedgehogs will get bits of fluff stuck at the base of their quills. I don't know why but some do constantly and others never will. It's no big deal though. Usually a tooth brush or a baby brush will comb it right out. The only problem will be is if you use an oil like vit E which will make it stick and harder, more time consuming to get out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
In an odd turn of events Camus has decided to move the fleece out of her corner before she poops. :?:
 

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I switched to fleece about one week after getting Dusty. It's the best thing I did. I went to the store and bought fleece throws, cut them the size of the cage and used the extra for blankets. I even cut some into strips for him to dig with. As far a potty...I got a tin pan and put doggy training pads on it. Cut the pads the same size as the pan. The pan goes under his wheel to catch to poop and urine when he wheels. In the morning I just change the doggy pad and the cage stays clean. He only goes on the pad. It's awesome! In 4 days I put all of the fleece in the washing machine. I have 3 sets of fleece for Dusty so there is always a clean set. My kids picked out really cute patterns.
 

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Hedgie Hugger said:
Just a WARNING on fleece..

I used fleece for a couple of previous hedgies and never had a problem. My new hedgie got some stuck at the base of his quills though and the process of removing it was painstaking for both of us! I know all hedgies are different but I had never thought of there being an issue from fleece.
Is it super necessary to get it out? Unless Quigley has a big chunk that I can get easily I leave it. If we have a bath or foot bath sometimes he lets me get it with my fingers or with his toothbrush but I never get all of it. Just wondering what the harm of it is and why it is so urgent to get it all out.
 
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