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I'm getting a hedgehog in the next day or two. I'm all set except for liners. I want to make linen liners, but I can't find an explanation ANYWHERE! Google only finds sellers; no tutorials.

From what I understand, it is either one layer of fabric on top of paper towels, or three layers of differing fabrics sown together.

Also, does it HAVE to be fleece? I'm wondering if I can't use some old blankets or sheets until I can buy some fabric, and I'm not too sure what we have around. What materials do I need to stay away from?
 

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Fleece is the most commonly used material I do believe from the fact that is cannot retain fluids like other materials can, so when the hedgie goes to the bathroom the urine will more or less pass through the fleece and soak into the paper towels.

Main concern about other materials is namely threads, another reason fleece is used, when you cut it, it doesn't leave loose threads on the edges. Threads can get caught around a hedgehogs feet or toes and if it goes unnoticed, it can become tight, cut circulation off and you'll either be cutting the hedgehog's leg off or worse, it'll die. Its also a concern if the hedgehog is a chewer, you don't want them eating the threads, which could cause an internal blockage (like with any animal).

Old Blankets or sheets would probably work, though blankets can have exposed seams, sheets on the other hand I don't see why not, unless its got rips in them, exposing loose threads.

Personally I go with fleece, its nice and soft and available at any Walmart, just make sure its actual fleece, because the first thing I bought were these 'fleece throw blankets' that I was going to use, and despite it saying "Fleece" in the name, its something else that doesn't even absorb water. I use them in the playpen, and the fact it doesn't really absorb liquid helps out since when the hedgehog goes to the bathroom (mine doesn't want to use the litter), its easy clean up and less laundry.

As for making them, I just measured out my cage tray and then cut out the fleece that's at least double the width of the tray and fold them in half. Creatures a nice soft twin layer of fleece. I lay down a double layer of paper towels in the tray, and then shove the fleece over top of it.
 

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I make my own liners with fleece on the bottom, diaper felting in the middle and flannel on top. I find that poops don't stick to the flannel as bad as it does to the fleece. These layers are sewn together so that there are no exposed edges or seams.
 

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I made my first liners a few months ago with the help of my mom. I never used a sewing machine before then. But one thing that helped me was my mom said to make a pattern using paper. That way you measure the fleece right and you have a pattern to use every time you make a liner. :).
 
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