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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
She deosnt seem to be loseing weight. She looks the same. :?
I have her on a diet and excersising her and dont know what els to do.
Any other things i need to know to help her lose weight?
Thanks,Lauren
 

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Get a good scale (check this thread out: http://www.hedgehogcentral.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=415&p=3403&hilit=scale#p3403) and make sure you measure her at the same exact time every day. She's probably losing weight if you have her on a proper diet and are not over feeding her and she's running on her wheel and exercising. You probably just can't tell she's losing weight by the looks of her. Our guy actually lost 50 grams, and I swear he still looks exactly the same as when we first got him :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Oh okay. Im looking to buy a cheap scale that works.
What scale do you use??
She NEVER uses her wheel but when she deos she sits there fro 5 minuts doing nothing!,then she moves at a very slow rate and takes atleast 5 steps then walks off!
She never runs on it at night. And she looks like she gained weight any tips on things that she can do thats makes her loose weight?
Thanks soooooo much for all you advice!! :) :) :D :D
 

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I don't use a scale, although, as soon as we get ourselves together, I'm going to invest in one. As far as the wheeling thing goes, she may still be getting used to being around you (she's a rescue if I remember correctly?). What kind of wheel are you using? If it has little grooves on it, it may be hurting her feet, and she's smart enough to not run on. Sebastian wouldn't run on his first wheel (a silent spinner) because it would hurt his feet really bad. We switched to a bucket and now we can't get him off the thing!

It may also be because she's so big and thus uncomfortable.It's a bit uncomfortable (or at least looks that way) for Ivan to run on his wheel because he's so large. He almost bends himself backwards to do it. For Ivan, our (extremely overweight) rescue, we've actually put him on diet kibble and only give him a certain amount of food every night. He lived off mealworms for 2+ years, but now he only gets one mealworm a week and/or when he's a good boy during (foot)bath time. This method worked for Sebastian too. We cut his calorie/fat intake down (nothing severe, but just gave him a few less kibble every night and a lot less mealies) and gave him more fruits, chicken, and veggies instead of mealies for treats (although, we let him cheat once in a while ;) )

You should also keep in mind that it takes a human quite some time to see the effects of exercise and healthy eating. It's the same thing with hedgies. You're probably not going to see a huge change in her size right away. It took Sebastian 8 months to lose those 50 grams. It's a very slow processes, just as it is (well, should be) for humans!
 

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Maybe you can let her swim with supervision....It can help her to loose weight. But if she don't like water, it's not the best idea...And like Sebian said cut her calories...I think it's the best solution.... ;)
 
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It does take time to see visible results, even the scale wouldn't tell you too much at first since your hedgie will also be replacing fat with muscle from exercise and muscle weighs more than fat.

You haven't had her very long, it just takes time. The first results you will see will be a change in energy levels. Your hedgie should gradually have longer, stronger spurts of energy between having to stop and rest. Most likely your hedgie will become more enthusiastic and less sluggish.

Play with her in your hands, let her run and run like a treadmill or stair-stepper. Start with a 2 or 3 minute "run" each day, and add time as she builds strength and endurance. Doing this will help you gauge any changes or improvements in her movements, energy, strength, and endurance.

It will take time for the weight to visibly change, but you will know you are making good progress if you watch the other signs that indicate improved health. :cool:
 

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Lifeisamealworm said:
Play with her in your hands, let her run and run like a treadmill or stair-stepper. Start with a 2 or 3 minute "run" each day, and add time as she builds strength and endurance. Doing this will help you gauge any changes or improvements in her movements, energy, strength, and endurance.
When I first read that, I thought you mis-typed and meant to put her ON a treadmill :shock: While the image in my head is a bit funny, that's BEYOND dangerous. I'm glad I re-read your post (a lot slower this time), Life! :cool:
 
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sebian said:
Lifeisamealworm said:
Play with her in your hands, let her run and run like a treadmill or stair-stepper. Start with a 2 or 3 minute "run" each day, and add time as she builds strength and endurance. Doing this will help you gauge any changes or improvements in her movements, energy, strength, and endurance.
When I first read that, I thought you mis-typed and meant to put her ON a treadmill :shock: While the image in my head is a bit funny, that's BEYOND dangerous. I'm glad I re-read your post (a lot slower this time), Life! :cool:
LOL- yeah, a real treadmill would eat a hedgehog and make hamburger out of it. :shock:

No, I meant on the hands.
:cool:
 

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You can scatter her kibble around her cage too.. This will force her to move to get her food.. You can count her kibble and cut back a little bit too..

I would second the swim.. If she likes the water definitely try to get her to swim a bit. One of my boys LOVES to swim. Hes normally all quilly until he hears the water run. Then he is out of a ball quills down . He will swim a bit then float on his back a bit(let her do this on her own if she choses dont force her to). I think he likes it so much because it takes the weight off his joints.

And you definitely NEED a scale. I can tell a weight change of about 10g+ but I still weigh the gang all the time.
 

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Since she's so large she'll probably be able to stand a few more baths. If urine or poop gets stuck in the folds of her skin (fat), it's not good for her. Even if you don't scrub her down with a toothbrush and just let her swim (if that's what she likes doing) it'll help get rid of anything that could be hiding and give her exercise.

Our rescue (and the others for that matter) gets a foot bath every time he needs it (like.. every other day at the rate he wheels :roll: ) and I've been filling the sink up to his tummy because it's been getting red and irritated because he's soo big. The warm water feels good to him and he'll even lay down in it sometimes!
 

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No problem-- if/when Ivan (our rescue) does get dry skin, I put a couple drops of flax seed oil in his food a couple times a week and he usually stops losing quills and/or flakey skin fairly quickly. So there's an idea in case she does get really dry skin.
 

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laurennicole said:
but hedgies cant take a bath for more than twice a month so thats not much.
I dont know where you read/heard they CANT. I havent heard "twice a month." You bathe AS NEEDED. And if you JUST use water its not a bath. The soap/shampoo/oatmeal wash(whatever) is what is drying and not recommended all the time. I have a hog that used to sleep in his litter box and cake himself in poop.. He got a bath everyday. Never had an issue. Cavalier gets swim time 2-3 times a week. He gets huffy if he doesnt get it.
 
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Everyone's experience is going to vary a bit because each hedgie is different and each set of circumstances is different. One hedgie may have more sensitive skin than another, or may have a reaction to a certain bedding or soap that most others wouldn't... etc.

Over time, you'll learn what your own hedgie's needs and limits are too concerning bathing, feeding, playtimes, exercise, etc. It is just part of "parenting", and everyone has their own style of "parenting" based on research, experience, trial and error, and the needs of their own individual hedgies.

You've got the mommy-jitters, seeing crisis everywhere, but you are doing fine and hedgie is fine. Take your time, relax a bit, and enjoy your little one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Lifeisamealworm said:
Everyone's experience is going to vary a bit because each hedgie is different and each set of circumstances is different. One hedgie may have more sensitive skin than another, or may have a reaction to a certain bedding or soap that most others wouldn't... etc.

Over time, you'll learn what your own hedgie's needs and limits are too concerning bathing, feeding, playtimes, exercise, etc. It is just part of "parenting", and everyone has their own style of "parenting" based on research, experience, trial and error, and the needs of their own individual hedgies.

You've got the mommy-jitters, seeing crisis everywhere, but you are doing fine and hedgie is fine. Take your time, relax a bit, and enjoy your little one.
yes i agree im rite know going to just enjoy bessie:)
 
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