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it's starting to get warmer, finally. So i thought it would be nice to give Bonzo some fresh air. What temperature should it be for him to go outside? I'm guessing maybe around 75 because that's what they need indoors; but maybe it's different for a short playtime? Also, is there anything I should watch out for? Like stuff that could be outside thats toxic?
 

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I was told by Reaper that you should wait until it's 80 before taking them out. I would also make sure it's not very windy, and that the ground isn't damp. Both of those could probably cause chills, too.
Make sure that there's no animal poop/pee around the area where you'll let the hedgehog play, if you have a dog or cat. Also make sure that you watch while he's out and don't let me eat any bugs. They could have pesticides or parasites that they could pass on to him if he ate them.
 

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I read a tip on from Courtney on chins-n-hedgies about this (here). Since ground warms more slowly than air, if you can stand on the ground comfortably without your toes getting chilled it's probably warm enough outside. If the air is warm but the ground is still cold, it's probably not a good idea.
Check for any holes also when you're cleaning up the area like lilysmommy said to do. You don't want your hedgie getting down any holes out there.
 

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I would just keep a close eye out for any of those things, and stick close to your hedgie. I wouldn't want to be far from him/her anyway, in case of them snapping up bugs, or in case a cat or dog was going by. They're so fast too, if you had one that was loving exploring, you could lose them in a heartbeat.
 

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I think the bare feet analogy is every bit as deceiving as saying if you are comfortable in a t-shirt, the temperature is fine. Everyone feels temperature different and my daughter could walk barefoot outside right now and it wouldn't bother her. Both she an my husband walk around the house barefoot all winter but the floors are cold. Doesn't bother them but it sure would bother a hedgehog.
 

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basmati said:
To add to this, what do you do to protect against birds, such as crows, magpies, or eagles?
This is being a bit eccentric. If you are in your yard and actively monitoring your hedgehog, the last thing you should worry about is a bird attack. I grew up on a ranch and watched magpies (cousins of crows) relentlessly harass my dogs for bones. However, it was a teamwork tactic of coercing the dog to chase and then scavenging in a quick manner. "Crows" do not hunt animals the size of a hedgehog. They are simply scavengers and opportunists.

Even considering predatory birds.... how do you suspect an eagle is going to snag a hedgehog? Let alone, why would you even consider the possiblility of an eagle being present while you are letting a hedgie explore the yard?

This notion is just ridiculous. I'm sorry, but come on. Do not give opinionated information (that potential new members can read) that has no basis.

Members browsing this site knowing nothing about hedgehogs are probably shielding them from "killer birds" now. :roll:

Nancy said:
I think the bare feet analogy is every bit as deceiving as saying if you are comfortable in a t-shirt, the temperature is fine. Everyone feels temperature different and my daughter could walk barefoot outside right now and it wouldn't bother her. Both she an my husband walk around the house barefoot all winter but the floors are cold. Doesn't bother them but it sure would bother a hedgehog.
Agreed entirely. It's a good "start".... but it needs to be a warm day (80ish degrees F) consecutive days in a row, and the lawn should not be damp. I wear short sleeve shirts in 40-50 degree weather due to growing up in a town that can get to -40F during the winter. The "t-shirt and barefoot" analogy only applies as a generalization.

Use your common sense and ensure that the weather is very warm and that the ground is not "cool". Simple as that. :)

Wouldn't hurt to just place a thermometer in the grass and ensure the temp is around 75 or higher. Then you would know that it is safe. You should have a thermometer handy for your hedgie cage anyways.
 

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ReMz said:
basmati said:
To add to this, what do you do to protect against birds, such as crows, magpies, or eagles?
This is being a bit eccentric. If you are in your yard and actively monitoring your hedgehog, the last thing you should worry about is a bird attack. I grew up on a ranch and watched magpies (cousins of crows) relentlessly harass my dogs for bones. However, it was a teamwork tactic of coercing the dog to chase and then scavenging in a quick manner. "Crows" do not hunt animals the size of a hedgehog. They are simply scavengers and opportunists.

Even considering predatory birds.... how do you suspect an eagle is going to snag a hedgehog? Let alone, why would you even consider the possiblility of an eagle being present while you are letting a hedgie explore the yard?

This notion is just ridiculous. I'm sorry, but come on. Do not give opinionated information (that potential new members can read) that has no basis.

Members browsing this site knowing nothing about hedgehogs are probably shielding them from "killer birds" now. :roll:
I've never really given much concern to a predatory bird carrying off a hedgehog or other animal but I don't agree that it can't happen.

Back when we had just gotten our first hedgehog we were considering taking her camping with us. At the time I was in email contact with a rescuer. I mentioned we were going to take Emma camping with us and she absolutely freaked out about it and the dangers of either a wild animal or a bird getting her. At that point I seriously thought she was a whack job. Emma would have been under close watch at all times. Well come to find out, her concern was because it HAD happened while they were sitting visiting and I believe it was a guinea pig was sitting in an open fenced in enclosure. I was still skeptical and still am for the most part, but every so often there IS a report of a small pet being carried off while the owner was right there.
Often we see hawks catching mice in the fields as the farmers are cutting and bailing hay. So there is a big loud machine that isn't deterring the bird.

Chances of it happening in the middle of a city is next to zero, but possibly in more rural areas.
 

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I strongly agree with Nancy about soil temps.

http://www.greencastonline.com/SoilTempMaps.aspx

It's going to be 85 degrees here this weekend but, if you look at that map, my soil temp is only in the low 50's.

Remember, cold ground is as dangerous as a cold floor. You wouldn't put your hedgehog on a floor that was 50*, so why is it ok for soil?

In addition, unless you put down a playmat of some type, your hedgehog runs the risk of insect bites/stings, injury from objects in the soil as well as male hedgehogs running the risk of getting foreign substances imbedded in their sheath. Even grass seed can be dangerous if it lodges in the sheath.
 

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"Do not give opinionated information (that potential new members can read) that has no basis."

**From the above reply, I was simply asking a question to others in the hedgehog community. It may be a silly question, but I took a risk, as I am here to learn. I am a new member and I have yet to go through a summer season with a hedgehog. I guess one reason for asking such a question is based on curiousity.

From my reading, I understand that owls can prey on wild hedgehogs. Since our pet hedgehogs would be out during the day, and being a non-native species, they may attract potential predators, as they move differently compared to rodents. Just a thought from an over-protective hedgie owner.
 

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basmati said:
**From the above reply, I was simply asking a question to others in the hedgehog community. It may be a silly question, but I took a risk, as I am here to learn. I am a new member and I have yet to go through a summer season with a hedgehog. I guess one reason for asking such a question is based on curiousity.

From my reading, I understand that owls can prey on wild hedgehogs. Since our pet hedgehogs would be out during the day, and being a non-native species, they may attract potential predators, as they move differently compared to rodents. Just a thought from an over-protective hedgie owner.
You asked a perfectly valid question on safeguarding your pet. Despite what one person feels, it is impossible, it has happened in the past and why not be safe rather than sorry. :)
 

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On the topic of birds, I don't remember what they were, but they would always attack my airedale terrier(50+ lbs dog) because she got too close to "their" tree. It also happened when us humans were standing out there armed with brooms :roll:

It's spring now, and with mating season, then baby season coming, ANY animal is more territorial nowadays, so it's better to be safe than sorry. And these were not predatory birds, just normal birds, so that's something to watch out for as well, even if it only has like a 5% chance of ever happening. Those birds would attack passing squirrels too :lol: but they eventually gave up on my dog, and I think they moved to a different tree, as there was another dog on the other side of the fence who'd keep barking at them. :lol:
 

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We have insane birds that nest in our roof, here. Though they usually leave you alone, sometimes they are pretty irritable and swoop down closer to you.

There is always the risk, even if in most places it is a small one.
 

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basmati said:
"Do not give opinionated information (that potential new members can read) that has no basis."

**From the above reply, I was simply asking a question to others in the hedgehog community. It may be a silly question, but I took a risk, as I am here to learn. I am a new member and I have yet to go through a summer season with a hedgehog. I guess one reason for asking such a question is based on curiousity.

From my reading, I understand that owls can prey on wild hedgehogs. Since our pet hedgehogs would be out during the day, and being a non-native species, they may attract potential predators, as they move differently compared to rodents. Just a thought from an over-protective hedgie owner.
My apologies then. I interpreted your 'question' as 'making a point in question form'. The pretence, "to add to this" gave me that impression.

I am a new member as well; newer than you I might add. So what do I know :p? I did come off a bit strong, but I was just being brutally honest (and making an incorrect assumption).

Sure birds can be territorial. You should see what magpies and swallows do around my house when they have nests. They are dive bombing birds from ****!

I would be more concerned about about a dog, fox, cat, poisonous spider, poisonous fertilizer, mis-stepping, losing track of the hedgehog, or even an asteroid falling from the sky (ok not really) than a bird getting my hedgehog. Just consider how unfeasible it is..... not ruling out the possibility, but the extreme unlikelihood.
* On a side note, all of the animal attacks are unlikely as well. What is going to try to grab SPINES?!?!?. Just don't want to mislead anyone*

No hard feelings ;)
 

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Don't forget our pet hedgies are usually friendly enough to not ball up to their "full potential" when in danger. An unsuspecting, laid-back hedgie could be injured or killed by a wild animal as easily as a kitten or rat of similar size.
 

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Not to mention, how many animals around here know about hedgies? They're about the same size as a ground squirrel, which don't have quills. The animal might perceive that the hedgehog has quills rather than fur and could have already hurt the hedgie by the time it realizes it doesn't want to eat this pokey thing.
 

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ReMz, no worries. The power of wording...... I had Bas at the vet for a mite check (none), and asked that question. The vet thought it would be OK. I guess I am leary of letting a small little thing outside, as I have never seen any small animal out like that, with the exception of a hamster in a critter ball.

I am from a rural background, and the wildlife is always considered and respected. I have not watched Alfred Hitch****'s, The Birds, but I don't trust magpies :lol: They are cheeky urban birds here that won't get off the sidewalk as you walk by. I wouldn't be afraid of them carrying a quilled snack away, but more afraid of a curious poke.

As for eagles, I remember a story my sister told me, where a tree which had an eagle's nest in it, had to be cut down. First, the workers had to ensure that there were no eagles in the nest. No eagles were found in the nest, however, 30 cat collars were :shock: Granted, this was a different town, and who knows how long the collection went for. Plus, an eagle has to eat.

When it warms up here (July??), I'll head out with Bas' top of her cage to place over her. Perhaps I'm a bird myself, chicken.
 
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