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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had my hedgehog Olive since the start of spring this year, she is currently in a plastic cage with a CHE. Throughout the summer it was easy to maintain the temperature of her cage but as it's been getting colder and electric bills are getting higher I'm concerned about maintaining the temperature in her cage. I've placed a sheet over the cage to try and contain the heat and the thermometer is reading around 25 degrees but I'm still worried a lot of this heat is escaping. I have considered potentially investing in a vivarium but I'm not sure which would be safe to use and would be compatible with CHE.

Any advice would really be appreciated!!!
 

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Hank “The Tank”
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A couple questions for clarification:
How are you measuring the temperature in the cage? Do you have a thermometer with a probe mounted in the cage? Or are you doing a different method?

temp can actually be a difficult thing to measure in my experience. Temp in the room may be good, except if cage is by window or has a draft or other airflow. Spot measurements via thermal pen or infrared “point and shoot” can change 5 degrees or more depending if the Che is on or off at the time and where you place the measurement.

my best results have been a temp probe, mounted in the cage, about “snoot height”. Make sure it’s not where air is constantly blowing over it, or in a space where sun comes in the window and hits it (than can really screw it up!!) basically, you’re trying to get an overall reading of the average ambient temperature in the cubic meter or so where your hog spends his time. Some details on that can help this great community help you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks so much for getting back to me!

So currently I have the thermometer kind of hanging midway into the cage, its not under the CHE but its like a few inches away. The room is generally a steady 18-20 degrees as I have a radiator near her cage which stays on throughout the day to this temp but obviously this isn't warm enough but means the CHE only needs to heat a few degrees warmer in her area! Hope that clears it up.
 

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You could save a lot of money on electric by buying a small pet heating pad, they generally run around 10-20 watts. If you put it under their hut it should keep a lot of the heat inside making it nice and toasty for them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I’ve considered a heat pad but she is a little burrower by nature and always burrows under all of the cage liners to the bottom of the cage. Worried if I got a heat pad that she might burn herself if she tries to burrow underneath? Do you have any recommendations for heat pads?
 

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Holly was 3 years old. Super cuddly and loving.
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If you get a good size wooden vivarium, it will be compatable with a che, if you can go for a tall one over shorter ones, taller ones allow more wheel space and will keep the CHE at a better distance from your little hog.

You want a che bulb holder that you can screw in into the wood not a dome holder.
You want that in the middle.

Hmm, my hedgehog loves his heating pad. Maybe I should switch to a heat lamp if its not good for them?
Heat pads will heat the floor more than whole air, so while it will help keeping the hog warm, its not that effective as the air above can become cold which means they can still hibernate.

Theres also been things on heat burns from them, this generally does depend on the type of heat mat you get but it is still possible.
 

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Investing in a modest pet heating pad might help you save a lot of money on electricity; these pads typically use between 10 and 20 watts. It should keep a lot of the heat inside, keeping them warm and comfortable if you place it under their hut.
 

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I've put my 3 cages into a corner-2 stacked and the other angled ;kitty corner' to the other 2. The cages are on the opposite side of the room from any windows or doors, and covered them with layers of covers of a variety of thicknesses that can be adjusted for ventilation. I've placed an adjustable thermostat space heater on it's own stand and faced towards the area where the 3 cages meet and where the covering is kept open. They all have their hides at that end to contain the warmth but also protect them from the air actually blowing right on them. The 36"-40" cages are plenty large for them to move to a cooler spot, though since the thermastat is set at 78F, they rarely move away from it. The residual heat actually heats the whole open small living room and kitchen area and is not expensive. My big concern is possible power outages, but I keep my vehicle with plenty of gas and an insulated emergency rescue box outfitted to move them with me to my vehicle to keep warm.
 
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