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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
my friend have 2 albinos their pedrigree are cinnicot and cinnamon, both from different parents, is there a chance that most of their offspring would be colored and not albino? how big are the chances?

i got a pair of albino, both are unrelated


the female albin'os, parents are algerian cinicot and algerian cinamon and grandparents are algerian cinnamon and dark cinicot

the male albino's parents algerian choco chip and algerian cinnamon and grand parents are algerian cinamon and algerian cinnamon?

how big are the chances that their offspring would be albino or there would be a chance that all offspring are colored?

and what is albino? a color pattern? or it covers the true color or the hedgies? thanks
 

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An albino hedgehog is like any other albino animal. They contain no pigment in the skin at all. And if I am not mistaken you would most likely get chocolates from breeding two albinos.
 

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First of all, Albinism is a recessive factor that masks the hedgehog's colour.
Since it is recessive, breeding 2 dominantly recessive animals together (albino to albino) will - according to Punnet Squares - produce at least 50% albino offspring. Of the remainder, 25% will not be be albino but will carry the albino factor (het) and 25% will not be be albino and will not carry the albino gene.

Of those that are not Albino, Reaper is right - given that most uncontrolled colour crosses produce Chocolate as it is the wild (or base) coat colour, the odds are in the favour of Chocolate.
However with that said and all things being equal, you may get the odd surprise and have something totally unexpected show up.

But... count on having an average of 50% albinos in the litter.

Bryan
 

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I know a breeder that put 2 albinos together and their 5 babies was albinos.

Another thing, Soraya, a breeder here, bred two colored hedgies, and the male didn't have albinos in his lineage and 4/5 babies was albinos.

We can always get surprise!! And I don't beleive people says: "I breed "that kind" of color to always get "that kind" of color". You won't know the color of your babies in advance!!
 

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Mika it not Sonara it Soraya :lol:

and she is right i bred two hedgehog one gray and one dark gray and in the peds there is just 1 albino on the mother side and i got 4 albinos and a gray so :shock: :roll: :D

like other says you never know what you will get until you try it hihi :lol:
 

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It's very difficult to tell with hedgehogs if they carry the albino gene. My Widget who is actually one of Bryan's babies, has an albino mother yet Widget has never produced an albino baby even when paired with girls who have an albino parent and have produced albinos with an albino carrying male. Widge, obviously does not carry the albino gene.

Recently I was going to buy a baby boy for breeding and I specified I DID NOT want albino anywhere in the lineage and was assured there wasn't. The pedigree I was given so I could verify he was not related to any of mine, did not show albinos, yet when I spoke with Jeanne at the registry and she sent me more of his pedigree, there were 3 albinos listed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Albinism will only be passed on under three specific circumstances. These are:

* Albino bred to albino
All babies would be albino.
* Albino bred to carrier
50% of the offspring would be albino and 50% would be carriers.
* Carrier bred to carrier
25% of the offspring would be albino, 50% would be carriers and 25% display the coloring of the parents.

Without breeding the offspring of the last example, there would be no way to know which babies were gene carriers. Also, the percentages are based on probabilities, but nature doesn't really work that way. On a litter to litter basis, you might not get this.
i found this at http://www.pawprintonline.com/central-h ... color.html
 

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Since the albino gene is recessive, shouldn't all babies be albino as well?
AA = dominant colour showing
Aa = dominant colour showing, but albino gene carrier
aa = albino

So if breeding 2 albinos, both will be (aa), so you get
(crappy punnet square)
......(a).....(a)
(a)..(aa)....(aa)
(a)..(aa)....(aa)

Where you'd get 100% albino. Just random curiosity, is there an "outside" factor that makes it differ?

To get the closer to the percentages that was given above, you'd have to breed an (Aa) with (aa)

........(A)......(a)
(a)....(Aa).....(aa)
(a)....(Aa).....(aa)

But even then, it'd be 50% albino and 50% carriers.
It'd be interesting to know what other factor contributes to giving 50% albino, 25% carrier, and 25% non-carrier. It doesn't seem to be gender based genes, as there seem to be as many female albinos as there are males. (random rambling) Could there just be some random factor that makes the recessive albino jump ahead of the dominant gene and show rather than the dominant gene?

And if you breed (AA) with (aa) then you get 100% carriers with dominant colouring.
(Aa) + (Aa) = 25% Dom non carrier, 50% carrier, 25% albino

But ya, it would be interesting to find out(if it's known) what kinds of other factors would change that %


(XD sorry, chem major with taking too much bio genetics classes)
 

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Albino can only produce Albino (or so I thought)

Be it noted that I do not , nor have I ever had any hedgehogs, but the subject is albinism on which I can comment factually. Being that the trait for albinism is the recessive trait and being that both genes for color must be the recessive gene for albinism for the trait to even show in the individual and being that both parents would contribute (the only gene for color they can)one gene each to the offspring which in turn would carry both albino genes - it has always been my opinion and teaching that a true albino mated to a true albino can ONLY produce albino offspring...UNTIL TODAY!!!! I have 3 Albino Ancistrus in my fish tank and they are 1 male and 2 female. They have spawned 3 times that I know of... having rescued 2 from the main tank the first time 41 the second time and 5 so far this third time. Of the 5 rescued in the past few days... ONE OF THEM IS BROWN WITH A LACEY PATTERN ON IT'S TAIL (CAUDAL FIN)... I'm really hoping it has pink eyes, though highly unlikely, and as of yet being only 3/4" long ; it is still too difficult to tell.. All the rest are pure albino!
 

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As a filal note. Upon further research I have discovered that it has been known for years that the Albino Ancistrus has two chromosomes which can carry a marker for albinism. If both markers are present on either chromosome pair, the result will be albinism. If an albino of this species has both markers on chromosome pair (lets say P1) is bred to an albino with both markers present on chromosome pair P2; the result will be an overruling of the recessive marker for albinism in both chromosome pairs in the offspring and the young will not be albino, but revert to the wild type standard coloration. Does this also apply to hedgehogs as well? Who knows? As to the wonderful diversity of nature; it seems many things are possible.
 

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Referencing Bryan's reply to this topic --- There is no such thing as dominantly recessive and as such your post continues to evolve based on this falsehood resulting in an overwhelming percentage of your continued statements being nothing more than false conjectures.
 
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