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I thought that I would post this here and hope that someone has dealt with this issue and can give me some guidance on how to help this baby. I have a 4 week old hedgehog that has paralysis in it's back legs. The vet has determined that it is completely healthy otherwise. It's back legs just hang there. The vet has stated that she feels that it would be best to put the hedgehog down as it would be hard for it to have a normal life. The hedgehog is a very strong little girl who pulls herself around by her front two legs. I have thought of building her a little cart to help her get around. I saw a rabbit once that had one and I don't see why a hedgehog couldn't have one too. She is a young strong healthy baby and I hate to put her down if there is something that I can do to let her lead a normal life. Or at least normal to her. Any advice is very appreciated! I also do not want to cause her any pain!

Tina
http://www.bloominhedgehogs.com
 

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It could be from moms delivery. I had this once but I lost the baby at 4 weeks. My vet had me try to work the legs it didn't work but. Good luck srry I'm not much help
 

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Oh no, please don't put her down. I've actually known of a hedgehog born without back legs, she pulled herself around and you couldn't even tell that she had no legs back there. She grew healthy, happy, and didn't even notice she had only two legs herself. Your hedgehog is so very capable to live a normal life. That is all she knows, so she is just going to think she is normal. Just like blind people, they don't know nothing other than darkness and there are tons of them that are completely happy because they don't know the difference.

Here is one as a baby with no back legs

And here is the same hedgehog as an adult

Every animal has a chance at life.
 

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I'm not a breeder, but I would not PTS unless she was unhealthy, couldn't eat, poor weight gain, etc. On that same note she would probably have to be kept, as re-homing is to risky and honestly why do it.

It looks like they can have a healthy life. Such a very interesting and amazing video!
 

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Chels said:
Oh no, please don't put her down. I've actually known of a hedgehog born without back legs, she pulled herself around and you couldn't even tell that she had no legs back there. She grew healthy, happy, and didn't even notice she had only two legs herself. Your hedgehog is so very capable to live a normal life. That is all she knows, so she is just going to think she is normal. Just like blind people, they don't know nothing other than darkness and there are tons of them that are completely happy because they don't know the difference.

Here is one as a baby with no back legs

And here is the same hedgehog as an adult

Every animal has a chance at life.
Those videos are seriously amazing. It's inspiring the way humans & animals can adapt to what would be considered horrible circumstances and be happy as ever.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I don't have any plans on putting her down :) That was just what the vet suggested. I was just hoping to find someone that had some experience or information with this type of paralysis so that I could offer her a comfortable life. The video is exactly what I was looking for. Time will tell if we have to have the legs amputated as they do just hang there and I worry that they could get in the way. She is not my only "special" hedgehog so she will fit right in. Just wasn't sure how to address her issue. Thanks for the video!
 

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The main concern I would have is that it's possible for her to get a lot of open sores on her back legs-- it's possible that amputation would decrease this risk, but I'm not sure if your vet would be willing to perform it, and you may want to wait and see if any problems arise before taking that drastic of a measure. The idea for a mobility-assisting device might be a good one for when she is out of her cage though. When she is in her cage, I think just providing a secure fleece-covered surface would be gentle enough for her, although I would not provide her with a wheel except during times that you could supervise (again, that risk of getting open sores and scraping the skin off of the dragging portion of her body). If hedgies didn't have quills I'd say experiment with protective body wraps lol but I don't think that would go over so well with her haha.
If there are no health problems aside from her legs, I think it's definitely possible for her to live a happy and healthy life. She obviously will require extra care and you'd need to keep a very close eye every day on her paralyzed region (in fact, if she'll allow you to massage her back legs and paralyzed area, that will help keep the tissue healthy) to ensure that she doesn't get sores and, in turn, an infection. I don't think it would be a good idea to adopt her out to anyone else unless it's someone with extensive hedgie experience that you know personally and would be able to check up on periodically, but a good quality of life isn't beyond her in my opinion. :)
 

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I had a hedgehog who was rear leg paralyzed, I can tell you that she at least lived a fairly normal life. I provided only the softest of cloth liners for her and she was never allowed to have a wheel as the running surface would have caused sores. She managed to get around very well, and quite quickly. I have a couple of photos of her pulling herself up and over my leg as she wanted the snuggle bag on the other side.

One major concern we had was her sitting in her poop or urine as she went to the bathroom and it causing urine burns. Surprisingly she managed to continue to keep herself clean. You will need to watch those areas in case it starts to become an issue. We were also concerned about sores developing from dragging her legs behind her, but she never did.

Mine lived a few months in this condition before she passed on from an unrelated cause. I had no regrets in letting her live in her handicap condition. She was happy, not in pain, and continued to be an active hedgehog. She would burrow around between liners, and just do her normal things (except run on a wheel). If you provide a safe environment, one which there is nothing in her cage that she can catch her rear legs on, one which is soft, and give her other things to occupy her mind, she could very well live a decent life.

Any idea what happened to her though? With mine, she had arthritis in her back and slipped a disc. Does the vet think she had a back injury during delivery?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm not sure what the cause is. She is still in the nest with mom! I don't get into nests early, so I'm not sure if it was a birthing injury. I just noticed when I got her out the first time that her back legs hung behind her. She was not able to tuck them under her when I played with them. The vets main concern was paralysis below the waist as this would cause other more serious problems. She does not have any problems with her digestion or elimination. She can also move her lower body quite well with the exception of her little legs. It just looks like both legs are dead for lack of a better word. If necessary, I can have them amputated, but only if necessary. I would only do it if they were in the way or got injured as a result of dragging them. I will get a video of her when she gets a bit older to give a better idea of her condition. She is a very strong little girl who does not know that anything is not quite right. Now, I just need a strong name for her!
 

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I found an awesome site that has female warrior and fighter names.
http://www.20000-names.com/warrior_name ... female.htm
i guess we'd have to see her but I like Andi which means warrior & Blair which means battlefield:)
It's awesome that you plan on keeping her alive hopefully you can keep her or find a home with someone who is willing to take care of her and cater to her special needs, the best of luck to you:)
 
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